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'March of the Sentient' Elephant Print.

Limited Edition Poster size (A0) signed & numbered Elephant Canvas print.  Only 7 left out of 25.  Save $50 until the end of December and also get free registered shipping to anywhere in the world. Print will not be mounted, but shipped in secure canister for you to frame as you please.

I am offering this once off limited print for $300.00 all inclusive. Regular price $350.00 plus shipping. 

This picture was taken in The Kruger National Park by Paul Oxton, Wildlife photographer and Founder of Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation.

All proceeds from the sale of these prints will be used to help wildlife in need. 

You can purchase one these prints by using the donate link on this page and use "Ellie" as your reference. You can also contact me directly with any questions at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Rescued Rhino Poaching Orphan Nandi on the road to Healing!

When Nandi first arrived at The Rhino Orphanage, she was everything a rhino shouldn’t be: alone, scared, sick, traumatized. Her mother had been poached a few days before, and Nandi had been eating sand because of hunger. This could’ve been fatal to the tiny two-month old cutie, who still needs milk every couple of hours.

Nandi when she had just arrived at the orphanage

When this happens, the rescues are treated by adding psyllium husks to their food to try and flush out the sand from their intestines. In Nandi’s case this process has worked very well, and the amount of sand left in her intestines is decreasing daily.

Rescued rhinos’ delicate eyes are treated by adding a lubricant to keep them moist a few times a day. If any bullet or slash wounds are present, they get treated during feeding times while distracted.

Luckily, in Nandi’s case, it seems as if the adorable baby is out of the woods; she is drinking well, starting to eat solids, and her health is improving day by day.

  

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation sponsors various items critical to the care of these babies, including oxygen tanks, IV drips, food, medicine, cleaning equipment, mattresses and a host of other things going into the care of these orphans.

Protection of the orphans is done through an anti-poaching unit supported by Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation. Supplying items that are needed, we make sure that the animals come first, and are provided directly with what is most needed at any given time. You can help: donate by clicking here..

Nandi arrived at the orphanage on 3rd December, she was about two months old, having just lost her mother to poaching. In most cases like these it is critical to get the babies to safety as soon as possible; sometimes they are flown in a helicopter to save time. Their eyes and ears will be covered to minimize external stimuli, because they are very scared. For the first few days, they will have around the clock care; their carers even sleeping with them on mattresses to monitor their vital signs.

Baby rhinos love to wallow in mud - it protects their delicate skin from sunburn and insects. When they are tiny like Nandi, the carers lend a hand in getting them all mudded up, as they didn’t get to learn this behaviour from their mothers. There are a number of rhino babies of differing ages being looked after at the orphanage, and they all have different needs, according to their ages, just like human children.

As soon as the babies begin to do a little better, they are taken on their morning walk, and as you can see in the video, Nandi has started to play a little. This means she is on her way to recovery, having been rescued only two weeks ago..

Nandi pictured below returning from her daily walk with her loving caregiver Jamie Traynor.

It is still a very long road ahead before this tiny rhino can be completely rehabilitated and returned to the wild, but luckily for her, Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation and The Rhino Orphanage will do everything in their power to make sure she grows up to be strong, healthy, wild, free and most importantly, safe. 

To help us care for these brave little survivors, please consider donating at the top of the page and also see what we do on the 'How can you help tab

Click here to visit us on Face Book.

Rhino Horn is not medicine nor a status symbol for the wealthy.

The removal of rhino horn powder from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the 1990's had largely reduced demand. During this period, horns sold for very little on the illegal black market, and on average, only around 15 rhinos were poached in South Africa each year from 1990 to 2007.  
 
Since 2008, the purchase of Rhino horn as a status symbol by the wealthy in Vietnam & China, has increased exponentially.  In addition, the renewed, but misguided belief that the horn does indeed have medicinal value, has escalated demand even further, causing a record number of animals poached in 2014.
 
 
Stockpile of seized rhino horn.
 
Rhino horn is not a miracle cure for  cancer or an aphrodisiac for the impotent, so why talk about the legal future trade?  It is unethical and immoral.
   
The pro-trade fraternity have used the ancient Asian myth and the flawed argument that Rhino horn use would be sustainable as a reason to lift the ban on trade. This cannot be further from the truth! False information like this should not be used to push for or justify trade that is economically non-viable. It is also morally and ethically wrong to sell something to a community, based on an ancient myth.