Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation

Paul Oxton (Founder, Director) Tel: 072 478 1808 email: wildheartwildlife@gmail.com Carina Crayton aka CJ Carrington (Co-Founder) Tel: 083 588 3550 email wildheartwf.info@gmail.com Registered Non-Profit Organization 147-339 NPO. PBO Number 930051372. Promoting Ethical Wildlife Conservation.
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation6 hours ago
On GIRAFFES … Zimbabwe

This afternoon, a friend of mine had a horrifying incident where poachers attacked and killed his last remaining giraffe. She was an old female, beloved by the family. Upon first injury, a shot to her head with a .22, she raced to the homestead seeking help and safety. She was bleeding copiously from her head, but the shot was not fatal. She was then chased, by the poachers, back into the bush, where she was then shot dead.

This particular giraffe was the mother of Missy and Skye, who both reside here at Wild is Life.

During this melee, a neighbouring farmer was shot in the leg, whilst trying to help apprehend these poachers. We salute his courage and all those who rallied around to catch these butchers of our national heritage.

Did you know that there are an estimated 8000 giraffe left in Zimbabwe?

In 1998, there were an estimated 27 000 giraffe in Zimbabwe.

These numbers are truly horrifying.

One the most iconic species of the African landscape is under serious threat.

There are many ways to tackle giraffe conservation and there are already a few good NGO’s who are working towards this. However, more needs to be done. With speed.

Wild is Life Trust has every intention of stepping up to this plate, where we can. We see action as follows:
- Increased awareness of the plight of Giraffe, particularly the Southern Giraffe (Giraffa Giraffa Giraffa)
- Bushmeat poaching prevention through our anti poaching units in our landscape areas
- Vigilance in the maintenance of powerlines (prevention of electrocution)
- Rescue of orphaned giraffe (which we have already done to a small extent)
- Treatment of snared and injured giraffe
- Engagement, including our existing collaborations, with NGO’s committed to giraffe conservation
-
This list is not exhaustive, but it’s a good start. Any support would be hugely appreciated.

We would like to thank @Save Giraffes Now for their first donation towards a dedicated boma for giraffe rescue.

Ref. on population statistics: Fennssey, Du Raan
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation18 hours ago
Huge Rescued Gorilla Forms Heartwarming Friendship With Tiny Wild Bush Baby:

Best friends don’t have to look anything alike to make a great team, just as these unusual animal friendships prove.

This is the incredible moment a 25-stone gorilla cradled a wild bush baby the size of its finger in its huge palms.

This is definitely a sight to behold.

Over 300 rescued animals live at Ape Action Africa, Cameroon – a sanctuary dedicated to the conservation and protection of endangered primates like gorillas, chimpanzees, and monkeys.

Bobo, a western lowland gorilla, arrived at the sanctuary back in 1994 as a small and vulnerable 2-year-old toddler, after his mom was killed by poachers. Over two decades later, he’s a strong, huge silverback gorilla, the leader of his group at the sanctuary in Cameroon.

But even though Bobo is the dominant male of his group, he’s known to be a gentle giant. And Bobo’s gentleness was never more apparent when the caregiver found Bobo cradling a tiny wild bush baby he’d discovered in the forest.

Most likely the tiny creature had been living inside Bobo’s group enclosure. But even so, it’s quite fascinating to watch it interacting in such a friendly manner with its giant neighbors. “The bush baby showed no fear of Bobo,” Elissa O’Sullivan, spokesperson for Ape Action Africa told Bored Panda. “He moved around his body and spend his time hopping around in an open grassy area, before choosing to return to Bobo.”

“Bobo’s group-mates were desperately curious, particularly his favorite female Avishag, but he kept them all at a distance, making sure that no one disturbed his new friend,” the sanctuary wrote. “Bush babies are usually nocturnal so it is very rare to see one, and even rarer to witness this kind of interaction. The little bush baby was happy to play in Bobo’s arms, hopping off to explore the grass nearby, before returning to Bobo’s hand.”

The other gorillas – three females and three young males, soon became very interested in Bobo’s new friend. However, Bobo suddenly became overprotective with his tiny companion and he kept his group away from it. “Bobo’s group-mates were desperately curious, particularly his favorite female Avishag, but he kept them all at a distance, making sure that no one disturbed his new friend,” the sanctuary wrote. “The little bush baby was happy to play in Bobo’s arms, hopping off to explore the grass nearby, before returning to Bobo’s hand.”

Original Article by Paws Planet.
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation18 hours ago
The illegal Wildlife and Pet Trade is decimating the Wild Populations, of all kinds of animals. In this case - for muti (traditional medicine):

https://africageographic.com/stories/african-grey-parrots-in-traditional-medicine/?fbclid=IwAR1d6K5aUx4gmBNMMZs_BGMMlTiNfSeaO70owtznoSG_B2zWAhK6qbmqjIk
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation2 days ago
⚠️Cape Town: #FireInfo
Cape of Good Hope SPCA
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation2 days ago
Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife successfully release a new pack of Endangered African Painted Dogs into the wild.

This is an important milestone in the conservation of this critically endangered species. African Wild Dogs are the most endangered carnivore in Southern Africa, with only an estimated 3000 - 5000 individuals left in the wild, of which only 500 individuals are found in South Africa.

Read the full story at: https://www.news24.com/witness/lifestyle/planet/ezemvelo-kzn-wildlife-release-new-pack-of-endangered-african-painted-dogs-20210417?fbclid=IwAR39o4-1o3MRE0tY6pkC0E7i-h_M985Qc8IzJMz8kZ87e790zRTi_liDjkY
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation3 days ago
Elephants kill suspected poacher at Kruger National Park.

A suspected poacher has been found dead and his accomplice arrested while trying to flee from rangers in the Kruger National Park on Saturday.

According to spokesperson Isaac Phaahla, field rangers were out on a routine patrol at the Phabeni area when they detected incoming spoor and made a follow-up in pursuit of the suspects.

“Three individuals were spotted by the rangers and attempted to run away, but rangers requested back-up from the Airwing and K9 unit,” said Phaahla.

“When they realised they had been spotted, the suspected poachers dropped an axe and a bag with their provisions in an attempt to escape from the rangers. One of the suspects was arrested following assistance from the Airwing and K9 unit.”

The suspect told the rangers the group had run into a herd of elephants and was not sure if his accomplices made it.

Upon investigation, the rangers discovered one of the suspect’s accomplices badly trampled. He was declared dead on the scene. The third suspect managed to escape with an eye injury.

“A rifle was recovered and the case was referred to police, whom together with the pathology team attended to the scene.”

Managing Executive of the Kruger National Park Gareth Coleman congratulated all those involved in the arrests.

“We are proud of the teamwork and dedication of our Rangers Corp, our aviators and the K9 unit. It is unfortunate that a life was unnecessarily lost. Only through discipline, teamwork and tenacity will we be able help stem the tide of rhino poaching in KNP,” said Coleman.

“The campaign against poaching is the responsibility of all us; it threatens many livelihoods, destroys families and takes much needed resources to fight crime which could be used for creating jobs and development.”

The search for the third suspect is underway.

Coleman has called on the community members living close to the KNP to assist with information.

Compiled by Vhahangwele Nemakonde

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