Life 4 Lions

#Life4Lions

#Life4Lions
Our comprehensive, ongoing #Life4Lions Project will run for the next several months, as we await permission from the Government to move through each stage. The attached pictures and video show the latest completed section of work. Please continue to support this endeavour - we have a long road ahead of us, with extensive costs. Details and updates below:
 
Project #Life4Lions: Working to save ToPS (Threatened or Protected Species)

Having been approached by the relevant Governing Authorities, we have agreed to manage and fund a life-saving Project that will ensure that a number of lions are given a future at a new forever home.

 

#Life4Lions What?
The #Life4Lions Project entails certain Veterinary Procedures (like Vasectomies - Phase 1 and 2), Veterinary care, Micro-Chipping, DNA sampling and recording, Vaccinations and Health Checks, Relocation and Transport of, in total, 21 captive-born, parent-reared lions, to safe, ethical, forever home sanctuaries. One of the family units will remain at the current Nature Reserve after all procedures have been completed. (Update: Phase one has been completed - see video below)

#Life4Lions Where?
The location of these animals is being withheld upon request of our collaboration partners, EMI (Environmental Management Inspectorate – aka Green Scorpions).

#Life4Lions Why?
Currently the lions are in a safe, ethical, non-breeding facility, with no human interaction, but their numbers are exceeding the recommended saturation levels as instructed by Nature Conservation. Consequently, we have received instruction from the Authorities to find the excess lions suitable forever homes, rather than risking the lions being euthanized.

#Life4Lions How?
Phase one of #Life4Lions was performing Vasectomies on two of the young breeding-age males. This has been completed, and you can watch the video of the procedure below. The vasectomies are being done to ensure that they cannot father any cubs, and protect them from the exploitation by the canned hunting and lion breeding industries. The further phases of #Life4Lions are geared towards ensuring the health of all the lions,(Phase 2 including the Vasectomies of two more lions) transporting them to their new homes, and making sure they have as happy a life as possible in suitable permanent, ethical sanctuaries.

#Life4Lions When?
We are currently awaiting further permissions from the Governing Authorities to move on to the next stage. We are spending time and money sourcing ethical homes for the lions, and making sure that they will be cared for properly. Currently, one of the main Reserves that 6 of the lions will be moved to, is in the process of completing their (>5km / 3.2miles) fence repair. Once it has passed formal inspection by Nature Conservation, and complies with WHWF's standards, permits should be issued, and six of the lions will go to their forever home, at a safe, ethical Reserve in a semi-wild environment exceeding 100 Hectares (>250 Acres) .

#Life4Lions What's Next?

Phase 2 involves the building of crates to transport the lions. Six crates are needed, and we are building it ourselves to save money. To purchase one crate is around ZAR12 000, where we can build it to Government specifications for around ZAR4 000 for all six.

We also need to perform the Vasectomies on two more of the Lions pictured below. Kijana (Boy in Swahili) and Lijana (Young in Swahili) need to be sterilized to ensure that they cannot ever be used for breeding.

During Phase 2 of #Life4Lions we are also ensuring that the lions waiting in temporary enclosures to be moved to their forever homes continue to be as comfortable as possible. We do regular site and veterinary checks, and install additional shade-netting, and whatever else is needed. We still need to find other forever homes, so that search is ongoing, with its associated costs. 

#Life4Lions How can You Help? 

We need funding for the transport crates. Buying them at ZAR12 000 each is not a viable option, as we can build 6 crates at a cost of ZAR 4 000. These crates will render the lons safe and comfortable during transport, often for hundreds of kilometers to their forever homes.

Veterinary Procedures on ToPS species (Threatened or Protected Species) are extremely expensive (in this case Kijana and Lijana), and our travelling costs are substantial, but we are confident that with your help, we can get this done. These lions deserve the very best. 

Please #Donate https://www.backabuddy.co.za/champion/project/life4lions-phase-2 towards this. This is your chance to help give these lions a good life. Every cent counts!

There are just too many lions in captivity in South Africa, and the devastating reality is that far too many of them will end up being sold to canned hunting facilities, and be disposed of in the lion bone trade.

Lions like Rafiki and Hatari (who have had their vasectomies as per the video below), as well as the two boys Kijana and Lijana, awaiting sterilization and transport to their new home, can never be free: captive born and raised, they have never learnt to hunt, and never will. The best they can have will be a long healthy life in a forever home where they can be appreciated from afar - through the lens of a camera.

You can help Kijana and Lijana by supporting Phase 2 of our very special Lion Project by donating here:

 https://www.paypal.me/wildheartwildlife

 payfast.co.za/donate/go/wildheartwildlifefoundation

 https://www.backabuddy.co.za/champion/project/life4lions-phase-2

South Africans can use EFT at:
First National Bank / Cheque Account
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Account number - 6251 855 4101
Branch Code - 250-655

As always, we will show you exactly how and where your loving donations are used.

#WHWF   #EthicalConservation  #Life4Lions"

 

Through BackaBuddy you can easily donate to our Project #Life4Lions to help #WHWF rescue and re-home lions. Payment methods for the BackaBuddy platform include Credit and certain Debit Cards, PayPal and Instant EFT.

"The Future of Wildlife is in our Hands"

Hatari's Vasectomy

Rafiki's Vasectomy

"The Future of Wildlife is in our Hands"

We rely completely on the kind support from the public

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Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund

Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund needs a Boost!

 

Our WHWF Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund needs a Boost!

The ability to be able to act quickly when confronted with a Wildlife Emergency, is invaluable.

At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation we have, over the past few years, successfully completed numerous Wildlife Rescues, often without having adequate resources.

We have decided to set up this Fund, which will be our back-up fund for emergencies, so that we have the funds available for when the Wildlife needs us most. Whether it is for fuel, to be able to travel to site, veterinary supplies that might save a life, or emergency food for stricken animals; your loving Donations are sure to be put to good use.

During LockDown we have travelled extensively, assisting wherever we could, rescuing several different species, and depleting most of our Emergency Funding.

As always, we remain committed to #EthicalConservation, and making sure the assistance directly reaches the animals most in need, as well as #Transparency - always showing what we do with the funds you entrust us with.

Please Help us Boost this Fund Here: https://www.backabuddy.co.za/champion/project/whwf-emergency-wildlife-rescue-fund

Please follow our facebook page to stay informed!

Thank you, from the bottom of our Wild Hearts, for supporting our WHWF Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund!

 

#WHWF

#EthicalConservation

 

Have a look at our Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation  Current Projects and Ethical Project Support to find out more about the animals we rescue and work with.

 

Through BackaBuddy you can easily donate to our WHWF Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund to help us act quickly when confronted with a Wildlife Emergency. Payment methods for the BackaBuddy platform include Credit and certain Debit Cards, PayPal and Instant EFT.

"The Future of Wildlife is in our Hands"

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation believes in full transparency, keeping donors informed at every step of what their loving donations have achieved and been used for.

"The Future of Wildlife is in our Hands"

We rely completely on the kind support from the public

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Rhino Milk Needed Urgently

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation regularly and consistently supplies the rhino orphanage with everything they need to look after the precious victims of poaching in their care. Over the past four years, we have supplied more than ZAR1.2million’s worth of special milk, food, medication, capital and infrastructure items to help the dedicated human carers to continue saving baby rhino lives.

#WHWF always makes sure that your loving donations are maximized and directly reach the Wildlife most in need. We work off wish-lists that detail the items required to run these special rehabilitation projects. This ensures that the help we provide is targeted, direct, and needed – and makes a real difference to the wildlife, thus maximizing the probability of survival of these precious #WildBabies.

"The Future of Wildlife is in our Hands"

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2 August 2020 Primate Rescue & Rehabilitation

2 August 2020:
Focus Area: Primate Rescue & Rehabilitation
Another successful #WHWF Project completed!
When we received a call from Bambelela to help with food and meds for the rescued monkeys in their care, we immediately jumped into action.
Home to almost 400 Vervet Monkeys being rehabilitated for freedom and wild living again, Bambelela was hit hard by the CoVid19 Lockdown.
At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation, we've done four trips to the Rehab facility during Lockdown so far, and have supplied several tons of essential goodies and food, to help the little guys and girls survive through this difficult period.
The latest supply drop was a big surprize, as we were only supposed to take through some veterinary medicines that they desperately needed.
With a total of 5 donations covering our fuel costs, and allowing us to purchase some critical items, we still had huge empty spaces in our truck to fill with food and essentials. Once again, our local community in Little Falls, Roodepoort, immediately started collecting and donating items for this trip.This is where our local support is invaluable. We cannot begin to express our gratitude to our friends and neighbours for supporting our projects in such a pro-active way.
In the end, we managed to deliver a good stash of fruit and veggies, several hundred kilograms of dry food, including maize meal, dog pellets, rice and pasta (which is critical for feeding the older and injured or convalescing monkeys), the eternally sought-after hand sanitizer, dish-washing liquid and washing powder. The smaller babies were not forgotten, and they received a stash of cuddly soft toys, baby cereal and baby blankets. The carers received cute beanies and soft 'human blankets' to help them keep warm when sleeping outside during transition periods.
Also included were hundreds of rolls of Elastoplast bandages to help with wound care, honey which helps speed up wound healing, sterile dress kits to use in the clinic for emergencies, refuse bags, tinned foods, and much more.

The

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation

Field vehicle, Scooby, also acted as an Animal ambulance, transporting an injured vervet for emergency surgery.

In these times we have no option, as human beings, but to stand together. It is the only way we will be able to survive. Those kind humans who look beyond their own strife right now, to help the voiceless; they are the humans who will form a stronger, more ethical world, once we have weathered this storm.
Thank you to our loyal Supporters - without you we are not able to do what we do.
As always, we are showing you exactly where your loving donations have been used to help the #WildBabies.
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation is a Registered Non-Profit Organization and Public Beneficiary Organization, based in Gauteng, South Africa.

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13 May 2020 Primate Rescue and Rehabilitation

13  May 2020:
Target Area: Primate Rescue and Rehabilitation
#Rescued #VervetMonkeys get Emergency Food during COVID-19 #LockDown:

At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation, we strive to always help where we can, and we'll never ignore an animal in need.

With the Covid-19 #LockDown entering its 7th week in South Africa, the future is looking very bleak for hundreds of rescued animals. We were fortunate enough to receive just enough funding to do another Emergency Food Drive for the Monkeys (and Baboons) at Bambelela Wildlife Rehab.
We loaded up with 1,800 mealies (corn cobs) from a farm close to us, drove through and dropped it off at the Monkey Rehab Centre, with hundreds of hungry little eyes following our every move. Once again, we were shocked to see how low the food reserves were. The next day, we loaded another 800 from a farm in Bela-Bela, bringing the total to 2,600 pieces of Corn.
Then we spotted the most delicious oranges at the side of the road. Juicy, healthy oranges are packed with Vitamin C to help keep the monkeys healthy and strong. We promptly decided to buy as many as we could, and ended up loading 21 bags of oranges, each containing around 20-25 oranges. The total quantity of oranges was between 450 - 500.
It was absolutely heart-warming to see the cold-room almost full of food.
Watching these little guys snack on the corn is just the best feeling ever!
Soon, every monkey in the facility had a full tummy, and enough energy for another day of mischief.
Once again, we thank our loyal donors from the bottom of our Wild Hearts. Without you, this is simply not possible.

Also a huge thank you to the dedicated caregivers at

Bambelela Wildlife Care NPC & Vervet Monkey Rehab, for the loving care you give to the animals every single day.
* Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation's work with Wildlife across Southern Africa is classified as an Essential Service, and strict permitting conditions apply.
We rely completely on the kind support from the public.
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation is a registered Non-profit Organization and Public Benefit Organization committed to #EthicalConservation.

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Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation Blog

WILD HEART WILDLIFE FOUNDATION BLOG & NEWS

Life 4 Lions

#Life4Lions #Life4Lions Our comprehensive, ongoing #Life4Lions Project will run for the next several months, as we await permission from the Government to move through each stage. The attached pictures and video show the latest completed section of work. Please continue to support this endeavour – we have a long road ahead of us, with extensive […]

Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund

Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund needs a Boost!   Our WHWF Emergency Wildlife Rescue Fund needs a Boost! The ability to be able to act quickly when confronted with a Wildlife Emergency, is invaluable. At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation we have, over the past few years, successfully completed numerous Wildlife Rescues, often without having adequate resources. […]

Rhino Milk Needed Urgently

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation regularly and consistently supplies the rhino orphanage with everything they need to look after the precious victims of poaching in their care. Over the past four years, we have supplied more than ZAR1.2million’s worth of special milk, food, medication, capital and infrastructure items to help the dedicated human carers to continue saving […]

2 August 2020 Primate Rescue & Rehabilitation

2 August 2020: Focus Area: Primate Rescue & Rehabilitation Another successful #WHWF Project completed! When we received a call from Bambelela to help with food and meds for the rescued monkeys in their care, we immediately jumped into action. Home to almost 400 Vervet Monkeys being rehabilitated for freedom and wild living again, Bambelela was […]

13 May 2020 Primate Rescue and Rehabilitation

13  May 2020: Target Area: Primate Rescue and Rehabilitation #Rescued #VervetMonkeys get Emergency Food during COVID-19 #LockDown: At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation, we strive to always help where we can, and we’ll never ignore an animal in need. With the Covid-19 #LockDown entering its 7th week in South Africa, the future is looking very bleak […]

African Wild Dogs – Spotted Phantoms

Highly Endangered – Effective Predators – Stunningly Beautiful The African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus (means ‘wolf-like, painted’), is without a doubt one of the most fascinating animals that roam the African wilderness. They are highly endangered, with only around 450 truly free-roaming (wild) animals in South Africa today. Sadly, they have disappeared from most of […]

Pangolin, The most Trafficked Animal in the World

Pangolins are officially the most-trafficked animal in the world. In October of 2016 at the CITES convention held in Johannesburg, South Africa, all eight species were upgraded to Appendix 1. This means that international trade in animals is strictly prohibited. In addition to this there are some amazing people working tirelessly to save this exceptional […]

Rhino Orphans Left Behind By Ruthless Poachers Deserve our Help

None so special as those who have everything to lose: The Rhino Poaching Scourge in South Africa is an international Tragedy because of its horrific cruelty, and the absolute nonsensical demand for Rhino horn. The silent victims who have no voice are the almost 100 rhino babies in sanctuaries in South Africa at present. They are […]

A KING WITHOUT A COUNTRY

In 1975 there were an estimated 250,000 Lions on the continent of Africa. In 2014 the numbers of these gracefully majestic African lions, have plummeted down to an estimated 25,000 on the whole African continent, A loss of 225,000 in only 39 years. The estimated 2,500 Lions that are left in the wild in South Africa does […]

One Elephant killed every 15 minutes

Poachers have killed over 100,000 Elephants in three years. The insatiable demand for ivory is causing a dramatic decline in the number of African elephants. Poachers are hunting the animals faster than they can reproduce. In the early 1970s, demand for ivory rocketed with 80% of traded raw ivory coming from poached elephants. A ban was […]

Trading Rhino To Extinction

Rhino Horn is not medicine nor a status symbol for the wealthy. The removal of rhino horn powder from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the 1990’s had largely reduced demand. During this period, horns sold for very little on the illegal black market, and on average, only around 15 rhinos were poached in South Africa each year from […]

“The Big 5” Is “Big Money”

“THE BIG 5″ is “BIG MONEY” and WORTH FAR MORE ALIVE. South Africa’s Big Five is much better for the country than previously thought. A leopard that lives for 15 years contributes more than R85 million to the state coffers. That’s the finding of a study conducted by the research institute Tourism Research, Economics, Environment and Society […]

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African Wild Dogs – Spotted Phantoms

Highly Endangered – Effective Predators – Stunningly Beautiful

The African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus (means ‘wolf-like, painted’), is without a doubt one of the most fascinating animals that roam the African wilderness.

They are highly endangered, with only around 450 truly free-roaming (wild) animals in South Africa today. Sadly, they have disappeared from most of their natural habitat range. One of the four free-ranging populations in SA occurs in Limpopo, and this is the area where Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation  is supporting a new research project to help save them from extinction.

These amazing animals are dying out as a result of habitat loss, human persecution and the outbreak of disease. They are mercilessly killed by subsistence and livestock farmers as a result of human – wildlife conflict.

Wild Dogs are highly social animals, with strong family bonds and a firmly established hierarchy. There are typically an Alpha Male and Alpha Female who rule the pack, separately ‘ruling’ over members of their gender. All other members of the pack are subservient to them.

The African wild dog is the bulkiest and most solidly built of African canids, standing 60–75 cm (24–30 in) in shoulder height, and weighs 20–25 kg (44–55 lb) in East Africa and up to 30 kg (66 lb) in Southern Africa.

Hunting typically starts at dawn or dusk, and is preceded by an elaborate greeting ritual involving lots of woops, licking and tail-wagging.

They are highly specialised diurnal hunter of antelopes, which get caught by chasing them to exhaustion. Highly effective, they hunt by approaching prey silently, then chasing it in a pursuit of up to 66 kilometres per hour (41 mph) for 10 to 60 minutes.

The same reason that makes these dogs such amazing predators, is one of the contributing factors to their disappearance – they are just such effective hunters, and need to eat much more per capita than e.g. lions. This makes livestock a prime target for them.

The African wild dog is a fast eater, with a pack being able to consume a Thompson’s gazelle in 15 minutes. In the wild, the species’ consumption rate is of 1.2–5.9 kg meat per wild dog a day, with one pack of 17–43 specimens in East Africa having been recorded to kill three animals per day on average. The young are allowed to feed first on the carcasses.

  

The African wild dog is a highly successful hunter. Nearly 80% of all wild dog hunts end in a kill; for comparison, the success rate of lions, often viewed as ultimate predators, is only 10%

Certain packs in the Serengeti specialized in hunting zebras in preference to other prey.  One pack was recorded to occasionally prey on bat-eared foxes rolling on the carcasses before eating them.  Hyenas sometimes act as kleptoparasites by stealing food that the Wild Dogs hunted.

Wild Dogs appoint ‘nannies’ to look after their young when they go hunting. They would then bring the carers and babies food by regurgitating some of the meat so their family can eat.

The gestation period lasts 69–73 days, with the interval between each pregnancy being 12–14 months on average. The African wild dog produces more pups than any other canid, with litters containing around 6–16 pups, with an average of 10, thus indicating that a single female can produce enough young to form a new pack every year.

Because the amount of food necessary to feed more than two litters would be impossible to acquire by the average pack, breeding is strictly limited to the dominant female, which may kill the pups of subordinates.

The San of Botswana see the African wild dog as the ultimate hunter, and traditionally believe that shamans and medicine men can transform themselves into the wild dog. Some San hunters will smear African wild dog bodily fluids on their feet before a hunt, believing that doing so will gift them with the animal’s boldness and agility.

There is only one of the factors contributing to their demise that we are in a position to address. With the Wild Heart Wild Dog Project we are attempting to develop a practical deterrent to prevent Wild Dogs from attacking livestock. As it is still in the fledgling stage, we can only say that it would involve ultrasonic sound frequencies.

If successful, this could be the solution to protect other endangered predators from human wildlife conflict as well.

This project is crucially important to the continued existence of these precious predators in the wild. We are working closely with the Legend Wildlife & Education Centre, who also hosts the crucially important ‘The Rhino Orphanage’. (Ongoing support to TRO’s Rhino Orphans is one of our main functions, and you can support us by clicking on this link; (Wild Dog Project/Rhino Orphanage).

Wild heart Wildlife Foundation was proud to have supplied the new game fencing  below, to help with this important Wild Dog project.

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Pangolin, The most Trafficked Animal in the World

Pangolins are officially the most-trafficked animal in the world.

In October of 2016 at the CITES convention held in Johannesburg, South Africa, all eight species were upgraded to Appendix 1. This means that international trade in animals is strictly prohibited. In addition to this there are some amazing people working tirelessly to save this exceptional species.

All eight species are listed as endangered or vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

There are eight species of this scaled and elusive creature. Four of them, The Indian pangolin, Formosan pangolin, Sunda pangolin and Palawan pangolin are found in Asia and are different because they have tiny bristles between their scales. In Africa the four species found south of the Sahara are the Temminck’s ground pangolin, Tree pangolin, Giant pangolin and the Long-tailed pangolin.

These ant- & termite eating little animals are the only mammals covered in scales consisting of keratin (the same as in fingernails, hair, and similar to rhino horn).

As they have no defence against humans, aside from rolling themselves into a ball, poachers can simply pick them up and bag them without any resistance. This makes them vulnerable beyond belief.

  

Interesting Facts about Pangolins:

  • They only have one baby per year, in Winter.
  • When threatened, they roll into a ball to try and protect themselves. The name ‘Pangolin’ is derived from meaning ‘something that rolls into a ball’.
  • Humans are their worst enemy, as other animals mostly leave them alone. Lions and leopards will try their luck, but cannot bite through the scales.
  • Pangolins walk on their hind feet, using their tails for balance and holding their front feet with its sharp claws in the air like hands. They use their powerful claws to break open termite mounds and ants nests to get to the juicy insects inside.
  • They can climb trees and swim.
  • Their lifespan is unknown, as they do not do well in captivity. The oldest recorded pangolin in captivity lived for 19 years.
  • Pangolin scales are smuggled by the ton, meaning that thousands of these animals are being killed per month. It is estimated that around 100 000 pangolins are killed and smuggled every year.
  • They do not have teeth, thus they cannot chew. The millions of insects they eat annually are ground up in their stomachs via stones and keratin to enable digestion.
  • They grow 50cm – 1m in length, with their weight being 5 – 15 kg. Their sticky tongues can be longer than their bodies!
  • Pangolins are Solitary, Nocturnal Animals.
  • Poaching of Pangolins is fuelled by Superstitious beliefs of ‘Medicinal’ efficacy.
  • A coat of armor made from Pangolin scales was given to King George III in 1820.

 

  • Share this Article, and create awareness for the plight of these animals
  • Keep your eyes and ears open, and report all Wildlife Crime and Suspicious Behaviour to your nearest Authority
  • Support trusted Conservation Authorities, whose Anti-Poaching teams will also protect Pangolins in their territories and projects. Make sure these organizations adhere to Transparency and #EthicalConservation Practices. To Support Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation in our various Wildlife Projects, please go to: Help our Wildlife
  • Share this information on all Social Media Platforms.
  • Educate Children where possible, and foster the love for animals in their hearts.

 Copyright 2018: Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation

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Rhino Orphans Left Behind By Ruthless Poachers Deserve our Help

None so special as those who have everything to lose:

The Rhino Poaching Scourge in South Africa is an international Tragedy because of its horrific cruelty, and the absolute nonsensical demand for Rhino horn.

The silent victims who have no voice are the almost 100 rhino babies in sanctuaries in South Africa at present. They are the babies whose mothers were targeted in one of most barbaric of all criminal activities – poaching.

Most of the rhino are being poached inside the National Parks of South Africa, but once a baby gets rescued, it is in a kind of no-man’s land, with the rescue centres receiving very little assistance from the Government. It is unlikely that this scenario will change in the near future, so ongoing support of legitimate rescue centres are needed. You can help by donating at: paypal.me/wildheartwildlife

Pictured below is WHWF delivering desperately needed supplies to The Rhino Orphanage.

  

One man and his team of dedicated carers are making a difference in the lives of precious rhino babies: Arrie Van Deventer started The Rhino Orphanage in 2012, with the sole aim of looking after and rehabilitating the victims of poaching. It was a world first, and many doubted that it would ever be needed as much as it is right now. But Arrie stuck to his dream, and with the help of his friend Paul Cilliers from Legend Lodges, the dream took a physical form. The Rhino Orphanage is a very special place, because no animal is turned away – Arrie’s love for them runs way too deep.

With Limpopo’s beautiful Hangklip Mountain silently watching over the rhino orphanage in the heart of the African bush, it is difficult to fathom the need for these sanctuaries. Man’s greed seems to be a world apart from there.

The Orphanage is not open to the public, because the aim is to re-wild the babies into a safe haven once they are strong enough. Nobody here wants a petting zoo. Every true animal lover wants the rhinos to be free, wild, happy and safe (with their horns intact like nature intended). It’s just that it is becoming increasingly challenging to get that done. Orphaned baby rhinos are often very weak, severely traumatized and dehydrated, because they refuse to leave their dead or dying mothers. They need intensive care and specialized treatment as soon as possible, and likely for a few months after being rescued.

Below are a few pictures of the babies successfully rescued and being cared for.

 

 

As soon as the Rhino Orphan gets a bit stronger, their constant human contact needs to be reduced, so that the human imprint can start fading. This is crucially important if there is any hope of them being truly wild and free to be released into a safe haven.

Rhino babies are split into different age groups, because they are so strong – they can easily hurt one another when different ages are grouped together. Unfortunately this also means that sometimes a baby can be lonely, having no-one in his or her age group for company. This is currently the case with Jaime, a two month old White Rhino baby. Babies like these need more human care than babies in pairs or groups.

Below we are delivering hundreds of meters of shade netting and Powdered milk for the babies.

  

The saddest part, Arrie says, is that we are only saving around 10% of the babies who fell victim to having their mothers poached. This means that only one in ten babies are making it to the orphanage to be cared for, the rest are not making it out of the reserves where they die from dehydration, starvation or injuries resulting from the poaching attacks. It is a heart-breaking statistic.

  

 
*Pictured above are the orphan Rhinos who are gradually being reintroduced back into the wild.

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation continues with our Fundraising Drives for the orphanage. With the generous support of the public, we have been able to supply the orphanage with critically-needed supplies and capital items, to enable them to go about their important work of saving the rhinos. This included a generator for power outages, infra-red lamps to keep the babies warm, oxygen tanks along with desperately needed medical equipment and supplies, 500 liter water troughs perfect for thirsty rhinos, Hundreds of meters of shade netting and field fencing among loads of other necessities, all of which can be viewed on our “How can you help” web page. Somehow we manage to tick quite a few of the bigger items needed off the wishlist! These deliveries are part of WHWF’s ongoing Project RhinoOrphanCare, and illustrates our commitment to Ethical Conservation. Because the needs of these babies are ongoing, they need continuous support, which we aim to provide to the best of our ability.

With our consistent support over the years, the babies Lunga, Faith, Kabelo, Kabira, Muffin, Matthew and Lesedi, among others, have grown into happy little rhinos, mostly spending their days in the bush, free and wild. They could be seen turning their well-fed little butts to our viewing vehicle, as they trotted away from us. It was a heart-warming sight, because they are learning to be rhinos, and will soon not need human assistance any more. Seeing them growing into wild beauties, is why we do what we do. It’s the only way for them to be. And it is what we want for all our precious rhino. We have so much to lose…

WHWF also support the unsung heroes “The Anti-Poaching Rangers” who help protect our precious Rhino orphans and their caregivers. We are proud to have supplied equipment and uniforms to these brave men pictured below who are on the front line of poaching.

 

Paul Oxton, Founder/Director and the team at Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation would like to thank all who support us in our mission to help our precious Wildlife in need.

*Pictured above are Lunga, Faith and Matthew enjoying their days in the sun while gradually being reintroduced into the wild.

You can become part of ‪#‎TeamWild, by joining us on our mission to Save Wildlife.  You can help by donating on this page or at: paypal.me/wildheartwildlife

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