Rhino Numbers in Kruger National Park to dip below 3000

The Rapid Slide into Extinction:
The most devastating news, as we still reminisce about #WorldRhinoDay2021.
The Daily Maverick reports:
"The new CEO of South African National Parks, said there may be fewer than 3,000 rhinos in the Kruger Park for the first time – despite the park authority spending millions on rhino protection."
In January 2021, Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation reported about the devastating losses reflected by the (then) new statistics. The total figure of White Rhinos in KNP, was listed as 3549 in 2019.
Yesterday, on 22 September 2021, #WorldRhinoDay2021, the CEO of the Kruger National Park, Dr Luthando Dziba, confirmed: 'The rhino population has declined by almost 70% over the past 10 years. This is … because of relentless poaching. We have officially released the numbers up until the 2019/2020 reporting period where basically we had 3,500 rhino.”
He stated that the country’s rhino population has declined by nearly two-thirds over the past decade and highlighted that there may now be fewer than 3,000 in the Kruger National Park for the first time.
Don Pinnock from Daily Maverick said that South Africa created loopholes that were exploited by criminal syndicates through licensing of hunting and legalising internal trade, but only shutting down of all rhino horn trade, removing loopholes and stopping mixed messaging – backed up by initiatives like the Pelly Amendment – would bring down poaching.

Dziba said, “I think another way of looking at the alarming stats… is the fact that it is possible to actually do something to basically restore the species but I think it is important to know what needs to be done to basically protect rhino in the wild.”

“We might have created loopholes… in basically legalising hunting and giving permits to international hunters and it is possible, but I think right now within the context of national parks, for instance, there has never been hunting in national parks. We are experiencing the brunt of the scourge of poaching and if you look at Kruger for instance, where our largest white rhino population is at, we experience some of the most severe poaching.”

"The fact is that Rhino Poaching is not 'just the death of a Rhino', but it is a cog in the well-oiled machined which is organized crime. With corruption being rife, mixed messages with regards to legalization of trade, and the failure of effective prosecution and convictions thrown into the mix, this is a recipe for disaster, and most of us can just watch the rapid slide into extinction with frustration and deep sadness," said Paul Oxton, Founder/CEO of Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation.

Carina Crayton (Co-Founder #WHWF)

With Thanks to Daily Maverick for the Webinar recording and original article.

#WHWF
#EthicalConservation
#StopPoaching

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Fun facts about Rhinos Learn about Rhinos here

Fun Facts about Rhinos by #WHWF

If you want to learn more about Rhinos, read on!
Did you know?
  • The name Rhino is the short form of ‘Rhinoceros, which means ‘Nose Horn
  • There are five different species of rhinoceros, three native to southern Asia and two native to Africa. They are the Black Rhinoceros, White Rhinoceros, Indian Rhinoceros, Javan Rhinoceros and Sumatran Rhinoceros.
  • The only land animal bigger than a White Rhino, is an Elephant.
  • Rhino Horn is made from Keratin, just like your fingernails and hair. Their horns are what they get killed for (poached). And it doesn’t make any sense!
  • Crash is the term for a group of Rhinos, like this below:

A Crash (Family) of Rhinos

 

  • Although they have thick protective skin, it is still sensitive. Rhinos take mud baths to serve as sunscreen and protect them against parasites. Rhino skin can be up to 5cm in thickness!
  • They can run very fast, much faster than a human when they get scared or angry, and you don’t want to be in the path of one!
  • Both Black Rhinos and White Rhinos are actually grey in colour. ‘White’ actually stemmed from the word ‘wide’, meaning flat and wide. They’re sometimes called ‘square-lipped’ Rhinos. White Rhinos eat grass and they are called grazers. Black Rhinos have a hooked lip enabling them to catch onto shrubs and eat the juicy leaves. They are called browzers.
  • Rhinos communicate through noises and poo! Baby Rhinos sound like whales when they ask for milk. Rhinos sniff their toilets called ‘middens’ to gather information about who was there. Click the Video below to watch Rhino Babies asking for Milk!

Adorable Rhino Babies asking for Milk:

  • White Rhinos are much more passive and gentle than Black Rhinos. Black Rhinos are so dangerous that they are the cause for Rhinos being included in the Big 5. (The five big, dangerous African Animals).
  • Rhinos are the oldest group of mammals, and have been around for 10 to 20 million years. They are living fossils!
  • Rhino Moms are pregnant for 15 to 16 months before giving birth. At two months old, Rhino Babies start to get weaned off milk. At three years old, Rhino Babies are fully independent. They live to between 10 and 45 years, depending on the species. A newborn Rhino should be up and walking within one hour after birth, but will remain wobbly for a few days
  • The average birth weight in Black Rhinos is 35.5 kg and 62.7 kg in White Rhinos. 
    White Rhino Mum and Baby

    White Rhino Mum with newborn Rhino Baby

     

  • Rhino babies eat their mother’s dung to acquire critical bacteria for their digestive systems to work properly.
  • Rhino Mommies and Babies are very close. In the case of Orphaned Rhino Babies, where the mothers had been killed, the little ones often die from stomach and mouth ulcers as a result of stress.
  • The Baby of a Black Rhino walks behind the Mom, and the Baby of White Rhino, in front of the Mom.
  • Their Magnificent horns are not only for show, they use them to defend themselves, to steer their babies, to dig up roots for nutrient and to test the depth of mud-holes before they wallow. If the hole is too deep they might get stuck and die.
  • To learn more about the extent of Poaching of Rhinos in the Kruger National Park, click here.
  • Did you enjoy this article? Let us know! Do you want to Help Rhinos?

Written by Carina Crayton (Co-Founder #WHWF)

"No one in the world needs a Rhino horn but a Rhino"

Paul Oxton (Founder/CEO Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation)

 

 

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Donation Tax Benefits for South African Tax Payers

Looking for a Good Cause to Support and pay less Income Tax in the Process?

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation is a Registered NPO and PBO. All Donations by South African Corporates and Private Taxpayers are eligible for a Section 18(a) Tax Certificate, which will assist in reducing the income tax payable to SARS.

Department of Social Development/Republic of South Africa. Registration No.: 147-339 NPO
SARS Public Beneficiary Organization Registration No : 930051372 PBO

Some of our past Success Stories with regards to WHWF's use of Tax Deductible Donations include:

  1. The sponsoring of our Field Vehicle, and equipping of it for Emergency Wildlife Rescue (Private individuals and Corporates);
  2. The Purchasing of an Anaesthetic Machine and Oxygen bottle system for the Rhino Orphanage;
  3. The Equipping of Theaters for several Emergency Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers, including an Operating Table and Theater Trolley used for Pangolins;
  4. The Purchasing of Capture and Transport Cages for various species of the Wildlife Most at Risk;
  5. The Supply and Equipping of Rangers with specialized Equipment for Anti-Poaching Work;
  6. The Tagging, Tracking and Monitoring of Rhinos as an Anti-Poaching Measure and much more..

We will need the following details to issue your certificate:

  • Date and Amount of Donation,
  • Full Name of Company or Individual,
  • Registration Number of Company or ID number of Individual,
  • Registered Address,
  • Telephone Number and Contact Details (email to send PDF of Tax Certificate).
Please contact us with any questions!

If you're still unsure, please take a look at our Future Plans and Wishlist 🙂

We're available for Corporate Talks and Education!

 

CoVid19 has wreaked havoc on the world, and as a result, we have lost a lot of Corporate Support. Please consider helping our Organization survive during these trying times!

Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation is committed to #EthicalConservation and showing our Donors how their Loving Donations are spent.

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Skukuza’s Specialist Anti-Poaching Court to stay Open

After a drawn-out legal battle spearheaded by Naomi Engelbrecht, President of Mpumalanga Regional Court, the High Court has ruled against appeals to enforce the closure of the Court based in Skukuza, in the Kruger National Park.
The Skukuza Court handled the bulk of Rhino Poaching cases until an abrupt announcement in 2017 resulted in Engelbrecht transferring Rhino Poaching cases to the Mhala Court, in a move widely condemned by Anti-poaching Pole Players and Conservationists. The Skukuza Court is heralded as a specialist Anti-poaching Court.
In a Constitutional Court order issued on Monday, 1 February, Engelbrecht’s 2017 announcement to move the Rhino Poaching cases will remain invalid, and leave to appeal denied.
Engelbrecht’s decision was challenged in the North Gauteng High Court, opposed by both the Director of Public Prosecution and Mpumalanga’s High Court Judge President, but this did not prevent her from moving cases during to Mhala within two years. All of her subsequent appeals have failed.
Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation commends this ruling, and believes that this decision will greatly aid the effective prosecution of Rhino Poachers.
© Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation
Read about shocking new details with regards to KNP Rhino Poaching here:

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Anti-Poaching Support

Anti-Poaching Support

 

Poaching is a highly sensitive and controversial topic. From the poorest of humans poaching bushmeat for survival, to the multi-millionaire running a Rhino-Poaching syndicate with military precision, to the Sangoma (traditional healer) poaching for Muti (medicine); the result is the same - dead Wildlife. Superstition has given rise to the belief that certain animal parts contain magical powers, and the criminals of this world are cashing in.

Anti-Poaching has become big business, struggling to keep up with the constant flow of dirty money into the pockets of Poaching Kingpins. At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation, we do our utmost to support the efforts of all who fight against Poaching. Because a lot of the focus is on Rhino (and Lion) Poaching, we have in turn, strongly supported anti-poaching efforts in this field, but not forgetting the bushmeat poaching via snares.

WHWF continues to supply food, equipment, uniforms and emergency kits for Anti-Poaching Rangers. From back-packs to water bottles, field first-aid kits, blankets, survival kits and so much more - the people doing this (mostly) thankless job need all the support they can get. We've installed countless early-warning cameras, supplied field gear, and monitored many, many hours of footage from trail cameras. We've fitted several tracking devices and collars on animals that are in sensitive areas. We've provided water and emergency assistance to rangers in the field, dehydrated after days of tracking poachers.

Most people are aware of Rhino Poaching, but do not even begin to understand the scale of the poaching of Pangolins (up to 100 000 per year), not to mention the poisoning of lions for their teeth and claws. We continue to educate the public, whether at formal talks presented by us, or impromptu meetings with strangers. We believe that children need to be introduced to knowledge of wildlife and the challenges they face so that we can raise a nation of Wildlife Protectors; and we are actively working to make this possible. (We're passionate that way!) These images show just a small portion of the Anti-Poaching work we are involved with.

At Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation we are committed to fight Poaching in any way possible, and help secure our precious Wildlife Heritage for the Future.

Current Anti-Poaching Support Required

 

Rhino Numbers in Kruger National Park to dip below 3000

The Rapid Slide into Extinction: The most devastating news, as we still reminisce about #WorldRhinoDay2021. The Daily Maverick reports: “The new CEO of South African National Parks, said there may be fewer than 3,000 rhinos in the Kruger Park for the first time – despite the park authority spending millions on rhino protection.” In January […]

Fun facts about Rhinos Learn about Rhinos here

Fun Facts about Rhinos by #WHWF

If you want to learn more about Rhinos, read on! Did you know? The name Rhino is the short form of ‘Rhinoceros, which means ‘Nose Horn’ There are five different species of rhinoceros, three native to southern Asia and two native to Africa. They are the Black Rhinoceros, White Rhinoceros, Indian Rhinoceros, Javan Rhinoceros and […]

Donation Tax Benefits for South African Tax Payers

Looking for a Good Cause to Support and pay less Income Tax in the Process? Wild Heart Wildlife Foundation is a Registered NPO and PBO. All Donations by South African Corporates and Private Taxpayers are eligible for a Section 18(a) Tax Certificate, which will assist in reducing the income tax payable to SARS. Department of […]

Skukuza’s Specialist Anti-Poaching Court to stay Open

After a drawn-out legal battle spearheaded by Naomi Engelbrecht, President of Mpumalanga Regional Court, the High Court has ruled against appeals to enforce the closure of the Court based in Skukuza, in the Kruger National Park. The Skukuza Court handled the bulk of Rhino Poaching cases until an abrupt announcement in 2017 resulted in Engelbrecht […]

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